TSB

 

What contractual pay is offered to mothers* on maternity leave?
Maternity Leave Period Occupational Maternity Pay for colleagues eligible for Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) Occupational Maternity Pay for colleagues receiving Maternity Allowance (MA)
Weeks 1 to 6 (first six weeks) 100% of ‘average weekly earnings’ This includes 90% higher rate SMP plus 10% OMP top-up. 100% of ‘average weekly earnings’ This includes any MA received plus the appropriate OMP top-up to 100%.
Week 7 100% of ‘average weekly earnings’ This includes standard rate SMP. 100% of ‘average weekly earnings’ This includes any MA received plus the appropriate OMP top-up to 100%.
Weeks 8 to 27 (next 20 weeks) 50% of ‘average weekly earnings’ This includes standard rate SMP. 50% of ‘average weekly earnings’. This includes any MA received plus the appropriate OMP top-up to 50%.
Weeks 28 to 39 (next 12 weeks) Standard rate SMP This rate is set by the government and is currently £139.58 per week. Maternity Allowance This rate is set by the government and is currently £139.58 per week.
Week 40 onwards Unpaid but core benefits continue. Unpaid but core benefits continue.
Tax Treatment: Both SMP and OMP top-up payments are subject to income tax and NI deductions. OMP top-up payments only are subject to tax and NI deductions.
NOTE: where colleagues’ ‘average weekly earnings’ mean that they would receive less than the standard SMP rate of £139.58 per week, they will receive this ‘standard rate’ as a minimum throughout the full 39 week maternity pay period. This includes the 20 weeks when 50% of average weekly earnings would normally apply.
This policy applies to all colleagues regardless of grade or length of service. Adoption Pay is the same.
What contractual pay and leave is being offered to fathers/other parent who opt to take SPL? Maternity leave and pay already taken is included in the calculation of remaining leave and pay. So, if the mother has already taken 10 weeks of maternity leave, she and her partner have 29 weeks of ShPP remaining to share between them. All ShPP is subject to income tax and National Insurance deductions. The table below outlines pay entitlements that apply during SPL. Colleagues will receive the higher of either the applicable SShPP or EShPP amount. Summary of pay to TSB colleagues during SPL*

SPL Period SShPP EShPP
Weeks 1-7 £139.58 per week 100% of basic weekly salary plus applicable allowances
Weeks 8-27 £139.58 per week 50% of basic weekly salary plus applicable allowances
Weeks 28-39 £139.58 per week Not payable
Week 40 onwards Unpaid Unpaid (core benefits continue)

NOTE: where colleagues’ ‘basic weekly salary’ mean that they would receive less than the standard SShPP rate of £139.58 per week, they will receive this ‘standard rate’ as a minimum throughout the full 39 week shared parental pay period. This includes the 20 weeks when 50% of average weekly earnings would normally apply.  Shared Parental Pay (Adoption) is the same

Does contractual pay have to be repaid if the employees does not to return? No
Will entitlement to SPL be reduced according to SML already taken? Yes
Is your contractual Shared Parental Pay reduced by the number of weeks of SMP received by the mother? Yes
Can SPL be taken from day one of employment? Yes
Is it tied to the date of the child’s birth? Yes
Are there any limitations on how SPL can be taken ie minimum continuous block? No. We encourage single continuous blocks, but applications for discontinuous periods will be considered.
Do you incentivise certain patterns of leave? No
Do you offer a bonus on return from SPL if minimum period it taken? No

*or primary adopter

How are you communicating and encouraging people to take SPL?

We wanted to make sure that all our partners knew about and understood the new legislation and also how TSB was supporting it through a policy that goes over and above our legal duty. Examples of communications include: We communicated to all partners via the intranet before we had decided what our policy was going to be. We wanted to make everyone aware of the forthcoming legislation and that we re working through our response (screenshot below). We also wanted to emphasis that ‘non traditional’ families would also benefit e.g.  same sex couples and those undertaking surrogacy arrangements. We communicated to all partners via the intranet once we had our policy written and agreed, emphasising our commitment to supporting all families and go beyond our legal obligations. We also put together ‘How to’ guides for line managers and partners. Our Inclusion network has planned events in Q4 this year to support people planning or returning from all types of parental leave. A senior member of the steering committee is due go on Mat leave very shortly and her husband will take SPL from December – she will be our first case study for SPL and is already planning on sharing her experience when she returns to work.

Can you describe what wider cultural changes needed to support SPL are being implemented?

We have always supported our fathers/partners to take leave to spend time with their families – our Paternity leave policy gives 2 weeks leave at full pay and prior to the introduction of SPL our Leave for Partners policy went beyond Additional Paternity Leave legislation requirements.  The introduction of the SPL policy has allowed us to strengthen that support and commitment. Once we have more partners using SPL we intend to use case studies to give people examples on how others are using the new policy and what the possible benefits are. We’ll particularly keen to get examples of men taking SPL.

What do you expect take up of SPL amongst fathers to be? Have you surveyed your employees about SPL and uptake?  Other surveys have shown that mothers may be unwilling to relinquish maternity leave: have you detected similar?

We haven’t surveyed employees, but anecdotally it seems to be an option that fathers/partners are increasingly considering, particularly as we offer enhanced pay. In some cases it comes down to a financial decision as women are increasingly becoming the main breadwinner in families. As we’re a majority female organisation we may find that we reap the benefits of more women returning to work earlier.

Do you have any insight into how parents might like to take SPL? Which is best for your business in terms of planning?

Initially we’re expecting to see a small amount of take up for a relatively short length of leave amongst fathers/partners.  This will suit our business as 8 weeks notice will give enough time for a short period of leave to be covered. As We will be using the above information to put together a set of examples, illustrating the variety of ways in which organisations are implementing SPL.