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Citi, Commended 2012, The Best for Mothers Award

Citi is a large global banking group, employing more than 8,500 people in the UK. The bank has, for the last decade, aimed to provide a high level of maternity support: policy to safeguard maternity leavers’ annual compensation reviews, back-up emergency childcare, childcare vouchers, an on-site BUPA health centre, a tailored Employee Assistance Programme, and the support from other parents though the Citi Parents employee network have all been components of their offering to mothers.

Citi understood that having good policies alone is not sufficient to generate a family-friendly culture. By integrating the support of mothers with the organisational talent goals, the bank has been able to develop their maternity provisions to not only help women through the maternity journey, but also to continue and build their careers after they return from maternity leave. Through a series of workshops women are able to connect with others in the organisation who are also either transitioning from work to maternity or returning back to work. For women who cannot or do not wish to attend group sessions (this is usually for senior leaders or when particular circumstances are more complex) Citi offers a more high-touch intervention of 1:1 coaching.

Crucially, Citi have been able to track the success of their programme. In so doing they have been able to demonstrate the business effectiveness of their maternity policies. 30 percent of their workforce cares for young children, and they have been able to measure, via their staff survey, that this group scores more highly on the following statements:

  • My work group has a climate in which diverse perspectives are valued
  • My job makes good use of my skills and abilities
  • My manager supports my efforts to balance my work and personal life

In addition, Citi has found that their maternity return rate has increased from an already healthy 86 percent to 96 percent in 2011.